Fossil records for the family Cassowaries and Allies

Dromaius ater   King Island Emu
Vieillot   1817
Holocene of King Island, off se South Australia
Primary materials: Complete skeleton

James C. Greenway, Jr.,
Extinct and vanishing birds of the world, second edition
(1967)
Dover Publications, Inc., New York


Dromaius baudinianus   Kangaroo Island Emu
Parker   1984
Holocene of Kangaroo Island, off se South Australia
Primary materials: Holotype: complete adult left tarsometatarsus
Secondary materials: Paratypes: many other bones amongst which crania, vertebrae, ribs, coracoscapula, sterna, humeri, incomplete pelvis, femora, tibiotarsi, fibulae, tarsometatarsi, phalanx pedes, part of the synsacrum

Shane A. Parker,
The extinct Kangaroo Island Emu, a hitherto unrecognized species
Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club 104 (1984): 19-22


The Tasmanian Emu is considered by many to have been a subspecies of the extant species of Emu, D. novaehollandiae.  But Tasmania has been isolated from mainland Australia since the Miocene, so it is more than likely that this flightless bird was a full species.
It went extinct at the end of the nineteenth century.

Dromaius diemenesis
Le Souef   1903
Holocene of Tasmania, off se Australia
Primary materials: two specimens British Museum, one specimen Frankfurt Museum

James C. Greenway, Jr.,
Extinct and vanishing birds of the world, second edition
(1967)
Dover Publications, Inc., New York


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